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A Decimal System for the Arrangement and Administration of Libraries Nathaniel Bradstreet Shurtleff

A Decimal System for the Arrangement and Administration of Libraries

Nathaniel Bradstreet Shurtleff

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230260471
Paperback
20 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ... strong resemblance toMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ... strong resemblance to each other- indeed, there should be no difference in them, excepting in the words which designate whether the books to which the plates are attached are gifts or purchases. Prominent upon each plate should be the title of the library, and upon such as are placed in gifts should be the name of the donor. Each should also have a place for the date of reception, and another for the accession number. Books obtained by purchase are considered as added, while those by gift are received. The accession number should invariably be placed between parentheses, in the right hand corner, on the lower edge of the plate. Card Catalogue. A catalogue of books, carefully prepared on a uniform system, with the titles in full, and having a sufficient number of cross references to afford needful information to persons seeking for works on all subjects, and by all authors, is of primary importance to a library, whatever may be its objects or magnitude- and no catalogue is more universally adapted to provide for the internal wants of a library than that which, being prepared in manuscript on cards, is generally known by librarians as a card catalogue. This differs very essentially from the slip catalogue, by being of a more permanent character, and more extensive in its details, and by being the key to the whole library. The following description of a catalogue, of acceptable form, together with a few brief rules for its construction, is not intended to be sufficiently explicit for all cases, but is given only in order to present a very general idea of the prominent characteristics of a proper card catalogue. The cards which are most suitable for this purpose are constructed of two thicknesses only of writing paper, so that while they...